What not to take with lansoprazole

What not to take with lansoprazole

Lansoprazole is a medication that reduces the amount of acid produced by your stomach. It is used to treat and prevent stomach ulcers and acid reflux-related heartburn and indigestion. It can only be prescribed by doctors with prior experience with this medication who are trained to administer it properly. This article will define what lansoprazole is and how to use it. We will also discuss the drug’s interaction with other medicines or supplements and its side effects. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions when taking lansoprazole and only to take it as directed.

What is lansoprazole?

Lansoprazole was first synthesized by Takeda Pharmaceutical Company in Japan in 1984 and subsequently patented. It was launched in 1991. Lansoprazole is a medicine that reduces the amount of acid your stomach makes. It is used to treat indigestion, acidity, erosive oesophagitis, heartburn due to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and stomach ulcers, and in combination with certain antibiotics to treat Helicobacter pylori infections.

The medicine is also sometimes used to treat Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, a rare illness caused by an ulcer in the pancreas or gut, and certain types of stomach cancer.

In the UK, lansoprazole is only offered with a prescription. It is available in tablets and gastro-resistant capsules that dissolve on the tongue. Both are available in 15 mg and 30 mg dosages. Additionally, Zoton FasTabs is a brand name used for chewable tablets. Both over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription versions of this medication are offered. Order it here from the Welzo pharmacy.

There are several dose versions of this medication available:

  • Suspension Powder

  • Delayed-release capsules

  • Delayed-release dissolving tablets

How does lansoprazole work?

Lansoprazole is a member of a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). PPIs work by inhibiting the "proton pump" to stop the production of stomach acid and relieve heartburn and ulcers.

Lansoprazole

When you eat, your stomach secretes hydrochloric acid to aid digestion. However, some people create excessive amounts of acid, which can result in illnesses such as acid reflux (also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD) and gastric ulcers. Lansoprazole works by suppressing the operation of the "proton pump," an enzyme that is responsible for the production of stomach acid. Lansoprazole decreases stomach acid production by a proton pump inhibitor, which helps to alleviate symptoms of acidity, indigestion, and gastric ulcers.

How to use lansoprazole

Lansoprazole is typically taken orally, either as a capsule or as a tablet that dissolves in the mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day, depending on the specific condition being treated and the dosage prescribed by your general practitioner.

Here are some general guidelines for using lansoprazole:

  • Observe all prescription label directions and read all drug guidelines or instruction sheets.

  • Take lansoprazole at least 30 minutes before eating. This will help the medication to be absorbed into the bloodstream more effectively.

  • Swallow the capsule or orodispersible tablet whole with a full glass of water.

  • Do not take the capsule or tablet in chew, crush or split form.

  • If you take the dissolvable tablet, place it on your tongue and allow it to dissolve.

  • Lansoprazole may be taken with or without food. However, if it causes stomach upset, you may want to take it with food.

  • If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed one and take medicine later. Do not take more medications than your doctor has recommended.

Who can and cannot take lansoprazole

Lansoprazole capsules are generally safe for most adults and children to take. However, some people may find it difficult to use it safely.

  • People who are allergic to lansoprazole or any other ingredients in the medication should not take it.

  • Lansoprazole may not be suitable for people with kidney or liver disease

  • If you are pregnant, trying to get pregnant or breastfeeding.

  • Children under the age of 18 should not take lansoprazole unless it is specifically recommended by a doctor.

Drug interactions with lansoprazole

Lansoprazole can interact with certain medications, causing unwanted side effects or making the other medications less effective. When taking two medications, it is not always essential to discontinue one to begin the other. However, it is important to tell your doctor about all the drugs you are taking, including prescription, over-the-counter (OTC), and dietary supplements, so that he or she can advise you about possible interactions.

next dose

Interactions that raise the possibility of side effects

When you take lansoprazole with certain medicines, you have a higher chance of suffering undesirable adverse effects from those prescriptions. These include:

Digoxin

Digoxin should not be taken with lansoprazole. Digoxin is a drug used to treat some types of irregular heartbeat and heart failure. When taken with lansoprazole, digoxin levels in the bloodstream can rise. This may result in digoxin intoxication, which can have dangerous side effects like disorientation and loss of physical control.

Tacrolimus

Tacrolimus levels in your body can rise as a result of taking lansoprazole. You run a higher risk of adverse effects as a result. Your doctor may examine your body's tacrolimus levels and change your tacrolimus dosage as necessary.

Methotrexate

In cases where methotrexate is taken in high doses, lansoprazole can increase the levels of methotrexate in your body. This puts you at risk for more side effects than usual, so your doctor may have you stop lansoprazole temporarily until your symptoms subside.

Warfarin

If you are taking warfarin, you may experience more bleeding while taking these drugs together. It is especially important to have your blood tested regularly to measure your INR (international normalized ratio). These laboratory tests help your doctor determine the appropriate dosage of warfarin for you.

Antifungal medication

Lansoprazole may decrease the effectiveness of antifungal medications such as ketoconazole and itraconazole.

Incompatible drugs with lansoprazole

These medications should not be used with lansoprazole. This can have serious consequences for your body. Examples of these medications

HIV drugs

Atazanavir, nelfinavir and rilpivirine-containing drugs may decrease the levels of these drugs in your body. This means that they won’t work as well to treat HIV. You may even develop HIV resistance. Resistance means that the HIV will no longer respond to treatment with this drug.

Saquinavir

Saquinavir is a protease inhibitor that is used to treat HIV infection, and it is metabolized (broken down) in the body by the enzyme CYP3A4. Lansoprazole has been shown to inhibit CYP3A4, which can increase the levels of saquinavir in the body.

This interaction can increase the risk of side effects from saquinavir, such as nausea, vomiting, severe diarrhoea, and abdominal pain. It can also increase the risk of serious side effects, such as liver damage or pancreatitis. Therefore, it is important to talk to your doctor immediately if you are taking both lansoprazole and saquinavir, as they may need to adjust your dosage or recommend an alternative treatment.

Interaction with herbal remedies

Some herbal remedies and supplements can interfere with the way lansoprazole works or may cause unwanted side effects when taken with the medication.

Here are some examples of herbal remedies that may interact with lansoprazole and should be avoided:

St. John's wort

John's wort herb is commonly used for depression and anxiety, but it can also decrease the effectiveness of lansoprazole and other medications used to treat stomach pain and ulcers.

Garlic

Garlic may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with lansoprazole and other medicines that reduce stomach pain

Ginkgo biloba

 This herb may also increase the risk of bleeding when taken with lansoprazole.

Before using lansoprazole with any herbal medicines or supplements, it's important to see a herbalist practitioner. They can help you make an informed choice by advising you on the advantages and potential risks.

What are some supplements to avoid while taking lansoprazole?

You may want to avoid a few supplements while taking lansoprazole, as they may interact with the medication or worsen its side effects. It is always a good idea to consult a consultant or pharmacist before taking any supplements while on lansoprazole. Here are a few examples of supplements that you may want to avoid:

Iron supplements

Lansoprazole can interfere with the absorption of iron, so if you are taking iron supplements, you may want to avoid taking them at the same time as lansoprazole. Your healthcare provider may recommend taking iron supplements at a different time of day or switching to a different form of iron.

Vitamin B12

Lansoprazole can reduce the absorption of vitamin B12, which can lead to a deficiency over time. If you are taking lansoprazole long-term, your healthcare professional may recommend taking vitamin B12 supplements or eating foods rich in vitamin B12 (such as meat, fish, and dairy products).

Calcium

Lansoprazole may interfere with the absorption of calcium, which can lead to a deficiency. If you are taking lansoprazole long-term, your healthcare provider may recommend that you take calcium supplements or eat foods that are rich in calcium (such as milk, cheese, and yoghurt).

Other supplements may also interact with lansoprazole or worsen its side effects, so it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new supplements while on lansoprazole.

Foods and drinks to avoid while taking lansoprazole

It's generally recommended that individuals taking lansoprazole avoid spicy, high in fat, or acidic foods as they can irritate the lining of the stomach and worsen symptoms such as heartburn. Some examples of foods to avoid while using lansoprazole include:

  • Spicy meals (chilli, curry, hot peppers)

  • Fried, oily or fatty foods (e.g., fast food, fried chicken, bacon)

  • Citrus fruits (oranges, lemons, grapefruits)

  • Product made from tomatoes (ketchup, pasta sauce, salsa)

  • Carbonated beverages

  • Alcohol 

  • Chocolate

Other substances to avoid while taking lansoprazole

While taking lansoprazole, it is generally recommended to avoid substances that can irritate the lining of the stomach or worsen symptoms such as heartburn. This may include:

  • Alcohol:   Alcohol can irritate the lining of the stomach and increase the production of stomach acid, worsening heartburn and other digestive symptoms. It is generally recommended to limit or avoid alcohol while taking lansoprazole.

  • Tobacco: Like alcohol, tobacco can irritate the lining of the stomach and increase the production of stomach pain. It is generally recommended to avoid smoking while taking lansoprazole.

  • Caffeine:  Caffeine is a stimulant that can increase the production of stomach acid and may worsen heartburn and other digestive symptoms. It is generally recommended to limit or avoid caffeine while taking lansoprazole.

Side effects of Lansoprazole

Like any medication, lansoprazole may cause adverse side effects. If a side effect occurs, it is often not severe and will go away once you stop taking lansoprazole. More than one in every 100 people may experience common side effects of lansoprazole:

  • Headache

  • Diarrhoea

  • Abdominal pain

  • Nausea

  • Constipation

  • Dry mouth

Less common side effects of lansoprazole include:

  • Skin rash

  • Itching

  • Dizziness

  • Swelling in the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs

  • Difficulty in breathing or swallowing

Serious side effects

Lansoprazole is generally well tolerated, and most people do not have any side effects. Serious side effects are uncommon, occurring in less than one in every 1,000 people.

  • Chest pain and a fast or irregular heartbeat can be signs of a heart attack.

  • Severe stomach pain can be a sign of a serious problem, such as an ulcer or a blockage in the intestines

  • An itchy skin rash that occurs in areas of the skin that are exposed to the sun, such as your cheeks and nose, can be a sign of a rare condition called subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This condition can occur even if you've been taking lansoprazole for a long time.

  • Joint pain is not a common side effect of lansoprazole. However, some people can experience joint pain while taking lansoprazole or other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).

  • Severe allergic reactions to lansoprazole may cause symptoms such as hives, difficulty breathing, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat.

  • Unusual changes in mood or behaviour

Lansoprazole use during pregnancy or breastfeeding

There is limited information available on the use of lansoprazole during pregnancy. Some studies have suggested that the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) like lansoprazole during pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of certain complications, such as preterm birth and low birth weight. However, other studies have not found an increased risk of these complications.

It is not known if lansoprazole passes into breast milk. However, other PPIs have been detected, and lansoprazole may also be present in breast milk.

Conclusion

Lansoprazole is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drug that is used to lower acidity in the stomach. Lansoprazole is generally well tolerated with few side effects. However, as with all medications, it is critical to inform a medical professional about any other medicines or supplements being used, as lansoprazole can interact with certain drugs. Overall, lansoprazole can be an effective medication for lowering stomach acid and treating the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. 

Lansoprazole is a medication that reduces the amount of acid produced by your stomach. It is used to treat and prevent stomach ulcers and acid reflux-related heartburn and indigestion. It can only be prescribed by doctors with prior experience with this medication who are trained to administer it properly. This article will define what lansoprazole is and how to use it. We will also discuss the drug’s interaction with other medicines or supplements and its side effects. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions when taking lansoprazole and only to take it as directed.

What is lansoprazole?

Lansoprazole was first synthesized by Takeda Pharmaceutical Company in Japan in 1984 and subsequently patented. It was launched in 1991. Lansoprazole is a medicine that reduces the amount of acid your stomach makes. It is used to treat indigestion, acidity, erosive oesophagitis, heartburn due to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and stomach ulcers, and in combination with certain antibiotics to treat Helicobacter pylori infections.

The medicine is also sometimes used to treat Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, a rare illness caused by an ulcer in the pancreas or gut, and certain types of stomach cancer.

In the UK, lansoprazole is only offered with a prescription. It is available in tablets and gastro-resistant capsules that dissolve on the tongue. Both are available in 15 mg and 30 mg dosages. Additionally, Zoton FasTabs is a brand name used for chewable tablets. Both over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription versions of this medication are offered. Order it here from the Welzo pharmacy.

There are several dose versions of this medication available:

  • Suspension Powder

  • Delayed-release capsules

  • Delayed-release dissolving tablets

How does lansoprazole work?

Lansoprazole is a member of a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). PPIs work by inhibiting the "proton pump" to stop the production of stomach acid and relieve heartburn and ulcers.

Lansoprazole

When you eat, your stomach secretes hydrochloric acid to aid digestion. However, some people create excessive amounts of acid, which can result in illnesses such as acid reflux (also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD) and gastric ulcers. Lansoprazole works by suppressing the operation of the "proton pump," an enzyme that is responsible for the production of stomach acid. Lansoprazole decreases stomach acid production by a proton pump inhibitor, which helps to alleviate symptoms of acidity, indigestion, and gastric ulcers.

How to use lansoprazole

Lansoprazole is typically taken orally, either as a capsule or as a tablet that dissolves in the mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day, depending on the specific condition being treated and the dosage prescribed by your general practitioner.

Here are some general guidelines for using lansoprazole:

  • Observe all prescription label directions and read all drug guidelines or instruction sheets.

  • Take lansoprazole at least 30 minutes before eating. This will help the medication to be absorbed into the bloodstream more effectively.

  • Swallow the capsule or orodispersible tablet whole with a full glass of water.

  • Do not take the capsule or tablet in chew, crush or split form.

  • If you take the dissolvable tablet, place it on your tongue and allow it to dissolve.

  • Lansoprazole may be taken with or without food. However, if it causes stomach upset, you may want to take it with food.

  • If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed one and take medicine later. Do not take more medications than your doctor has recommended.

Who can and cannot take lansoprazole

Lansoprazole capsules are generally safe for most adults and children to take. However, some people may find it difficult to use it safely.

  • People who are allergic to lansoprazole or any other ingredients in the medication should not take it.

  • Lansoprazole may not be suitable for people with kidney or liver disease

  • If you are pregnant, trying to get pregnant or breastfeeding.

  • Children under the age of 18 should not take lansoprazole unless it is specifically recommended by a doctor.

Drug interactions with lansoprazole

Lansoprazole can interact with certain medications, causing unwanted side effects or making the other medications less effective. When taking two medications, it is not always essential to discontinue one to begin the other. However, it is important to tell your doctor about all the drugs you are taking, including prescription, over-the-counter (OTC), and dietary supplements, so that he or she can advise you about possible interactions.

next dose

Interactions that raise the possibility of side effects

When you take lansoprazole with certain medicines, you have a higher chance of suffering undesirable adverse effects from those prescriptions. These include:

Digoxin

Digoxin should not be taken with lansoprazole. Digoxin is a drug used to treat some types of irregular heartbeat and heart failure. When taken with lansoprazole, digoxin levels in the bloodstream can rise. This may result in digoxin intoxication, which can have dangerous side effects like disorientation and loss of physical control.

Tacrolimus

Tacrolimus levels in your body can rise as a result of taking lansoprazole. You run a higher risk of adverse effects as a result. Your doctor may examine your body's tacrolimus levels and change your tacrolimus dosage as necessary.

Methotrexate

In cases where methotrexate is taken in high doses, lansoprazole can increase the levels of methotrexate in your body. This puts you at risk for more side effects than usual, so your doctor may have you stop lansoprazole temporarily until your symptoms subside.

Warfarin

If you are taking warfarin, you may experience more bleeding while taking these drugs together. It is especially important to have your blood tested regularly to measure your INR (international normalized ratio). These laboratory tests help your doctor determine the appropriate dosage of warfarin for you.

Antifungal medication

Lansoprazole may decrease the effectiveness of antifungal medications such as ketoconazole and itraconazole.

Incompatible drugs with lansoprazole

These medications should not be used with lansoprazole. This can have serious consequences for your body. Examples of these medications

HIV drugs

Atazanavir, nelfinavir and rilpivirine-containing drugs may decrease the levels of these drugs in your body. This means that they won’t work as well to treat HIV. You may even develop HIV resistance. Resistance means that the HIV will no longer respond to treatment with this drug.

Saquinavir

Saquinavir is a protease inhibitor that is used to treat HIV infection, and it is metabolized (broken down) in the body by the enzyme CYP3A4. Lansoprazole has been shown to inhibit CYP3A4, which can increase the levels of saquinavir in the body.

This interaction can increase the risk of side effects from saquinavir, such as nausea, vomiting, severe diarrhoea, and abdominal pain. It can also increase the risk of serious side effects, such as liver damage or pancreatitis. Therefore, it is important to talk to your doctor immediately if you are taking both lansoprazole and saquinavir, as they may need to adjust your dosage or recommend an alternative treatment.

Interaction with herbal remedies

Some herbal remedies and supplements can interfere with the way lansoprazole works or may cause unwanted side effects when taken with the medication.

Here are some examples of herbal remedies that may interact with lansoprazole and should be avoided:

St. John's wort

John's wort herb is commonly used for depression and anxiety, but it can also decrease the effectiveness of lansoprazole and other medications used to treat stomach pain and ulcers.

Garlic

Garlic may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with lansoprazole and other medicines that reduce stomach pain

Ginkgo biloba

 This herb may also increase the risk of bleeding when taken with lansoprazole.

Before using lansoprazole with any herbal medicines or supplements, it's important to see a herbalist practitioner. They can help you make an informed choice by advising you on the advantages and potential risks.

What are some supplements to avoid while taking lansoprazole?

You may want to avoid a few supplements while taking lansoprazole, as they may interact with the medication or worsen its side effects. It is always a good idea to consult a consultant or pharmacist before taking any supplements while on lansoprazole. Here are a few examples of supplements that you may want to avoid:

Iron supplements

Lansoprazole can interfere with the absorption of iron, so if you are taking iron supplements, you may want to avoid taking them at the same time as lansoprazole. Your healthcare provider may recommend taking iron supplements at a different time of day or switching to a different form of iron.

Vitamin B12

Lansoprazole can reduce the absorption of vitamin B12, which can lead to a deficiency over time. If you are taking lansoprazole long-term, your healthcare professional may recommend taking vitamin B12 supplements or eating foods rich in vitamin B12 (such as meat, fish, and dairy products).

Calcium

Lansoprazole may interfere with the absorption of calcium, which can lead to a deficiency. If you are taking lansoprazole long-term, your healthcare provider may recommend that you take calcium supplements or eat foods that are rich in calcium (such as milk, cheese, and yoghurt).

Other supplements may also interact with lansoprazole or worsen its side effects, so it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new supplements while on lansoprazole.

Foods and drinks to avoid while taking lansoprazole

It's generally recommended that individuals taking lansoprazole avoid spicy, high in fat, or acidic foods as they can irritate the lining of the stomach and worsen symptoms such as heartburn. Some examples of foods to avoid while using lansoprazole include:

  • Spicy meals (chilli, curry, hot peppers)

  • Fried, oily or fatty foods (e.g., fast food, fried chicken, bacon)

  • Citrus fruits (oranges, lemons, grapefruits)

  • Product made from tomatoes (ketchup, pasta sauce, salsa)

  • Carbonated beverages

  • Alcohol 

  • Chocolate

Other substances to avoid while taking lansoprazole

While taking lansoprazole, it is generally recommended to avoid substances that can irritate the lining of the stomach or worsen symptoms such as heartburn. This may include:

  • Alcohol:   Alcohol can irritate the lining of the stomach and increase the production of stomach acid, worsening heartburn and other digestive symptoms. It is generally recommended to limit or avoid alcohol while taking lansoprazole.

  • Tobacco: Like alcohol, tobacco can irritate the lining of the stomach and increase the production of stomach pain. It is generally recommended to avoid smoking while taking lansoprazole.

  • Caffeine:  Caffeine is a stimulant that can increase the production of stomach acid and may worsen heartburn and other digestive symptoms. It is generally recommended to limit or avoid caffeine while taking lansoprazole.

Side effects of Lansoprazole

Like any medication, lansoprazole may cause adverse side effects. If a side effect occurs, it is often not severe and will go away once you stop taking lansoprazole. More than one in every 100 people may experience common side effects of lansoprazole:

  • Headache

  • Diarrhoea

  • Abdominal pain

  • Nausea

  • Constipation

  • Dry mouth

Less common side effects of lansoprazole include:

  • Skin rash

  • Itching

  • Dizziness

  • Swelling in the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs

  • Difficulty in breathing or swallowing

Serious side effects

Lansoprazole is generally well tolerated, and most people do not have any side effects. Serious side effects are uncommon, occurring in less than one in every 1,000 people.

  • Chest pain and a fast or irregular heartbeat can be signs of a heart attack.

  • Severe stomach pain can be a sign of a serious problem, such as an ulcer or a blockage in the intestines

  • An itchy skin rash that occurs in areas of the skin that are exposed to the sun, such as your cheeks and nose, can be a sign of a rare condition called subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This condition can occur even if you've been taking lansoprazole for a long time.

  • Joint pain is not a common side effect of lansoprazole. However, some people can experience joint pain while taking lansoprazole or other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).

  • Severe allergic reactions to lansoprazole may cause symptoms such as hives, difficulty breathing, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat.

  • Unusual changes in mood or behaviour

Lansoprazole use during pregnancy or breastfeeding

There is limited information available on the use of lansoprazole during pregnancy. Some studies have suggested that the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) like lansoprazole during pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of certain complications, such as preterm birth and low birth weight. However, other studies have not found an increased risk of these complications.

It is not known if lansoprazole passes into breast milk. However, other PPIs have been detected, and lansoprazole may also be present in breast milk.

Conclusion

Lansoprazole is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drug that is used to lower acidity in the stomach. Lansoprazole is generally well tolerated with few side effects. However, as with all medications, it is critical to inform a medical professional about any other medicines or supplements being used, as lansoprazole can interact with certain drugs. Overall, lansoprazole can be an effective medication for lowering stomach acid and treating the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. 

Order lansoprazole here from the Welzo pharmacy.

Read about the ultimate 7-day acid-reflux diet or learn more about other heartburn medications including omeprazole and Andrew salts

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